The  Art Nouveau (Peranakan) tiles of Bukit Brown have caught the attention of a French academic who helms an international research team. The team  has embarked on a 4 year study of the tiles in Asia, under an MOU with the Unesco University and Heritage Forum.

Professor Chantal Zheng together with her husband, Dr Zheng Shun-De, visited Bukit Brown recently, guided by our tiles expert, Victor Lim.

Victor Lim guiding.a grooup  Chantal Zheng ( ) with her husband

Victor Lim with Chantal and Shun De Zheng, pictured here nearest to Victor.  (photo Claire Leow)

The visit, so impressed them, they wrote to All Things Bukit Brown to tell us more about their project and how they hope, they can include Bukit Brown in their study. Reproduced here with Professor Chantal’s kind permission.

“I am very grateful to your association and to Mr Victor LIM for having introduced me to this fascinating Singapore Cultural Heritage field concerning « Art nouveau tiles ». As a matter of fact, this is particularly interesting for the Tiles research team I am responsable for in the IRASIA (Research Institute for Asian Studies): Aix-Marseille University in the south of France. My Research Institute (IRASIA) is conducting historical, anthropological and sociological researches on many countries in East and South-East Asia such as China, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Japan, India, and Taiwan.

Three years ago, we submitted on the behalf of the University a research project on “Art nouveau tiles” in Asia to the Unesco University and Heritage Forum. The project has been accepted and a MOU has been signed by Aix – Marseille Université and The Unesco Forum for 4 years (2012-2016). The first objective being to make a survey of the presence of these specific tiles in East Asia (China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea), South-East Asia (Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Indonesia) and even in South Asia with India. The second objective is to select and write a report on some particular and (to use Unesco vocabularly) “exceptional” places where tiles are found in great number.

It appears that these tiles have been diffused by the Chinese Diaspora and the Peranakan culture in Asia. They constitute a cultural asset common to many Asian countries, are the testimony of cultural, artistic and even commercial exchanges between East and West at the beginning of the XXth century and that is why they present a very great interest for the research. In Singapore, I have discovered many districts with very beautiful and unique houses decorated with a profusion of tiles, all in very good state and very well preserved. And I also had the opportunity to make a visit to Bukit Brown Cemetery

I was very surprised to see so many beautiful Peranakan tombs decorated with old tiles. As far as I understand the situation, this cemetery is now on the way to being destroyed for the construction of a road. That is a real pity indeed and I do hope very sincerely the tiles may be preserved, as I doubt there is another place in the world comparable to Bukit Brown. It is our hope that these tiles will be kept in good condition as they must be considered an important element of the Singapore national treasure.

Conscious of the interest that Singapore presents and of the precious contribution of the Peranakan culture to its cultural heritage, my research team on Asian Art nouveau tiles (which includes 7 French researchers and architects, a Japanese Museum director: Hyogo Prefectural Museum of Archaelogy, a Taiwanese Association for Cultural Heritage, a Taiwanese historian and a Taiwanese architect: University of Kaohsiung), is prepared to focus now on the history of the Republic of Singapore to discover the cultural and commercial links with other Asian countries in the diffusion of Art Nouveau tiles (Japanese or European). We are very grateful to your association and to your colleagues for the help in our research during our short stay in Singapore and hope we will continue in the future to cooperate with you and with Singapore architects and historians on the tiles subject.” Chantal ZHENG, Professor, Department of Asiatic Studies, Aix-Marseille Université

Victor together with the Zhengs at his office

The Zhengs at Victor Lim’s office showcasing his collection of tiles

Montage of Tiles (photo composite: Joy Loh)

Montage of Tiles (photo composite: Joy Loh)

book (photo Victor Lim)

A book on art nouveau tiles in French published by the Zhengs (photo Victor Lim)

You can learn more about the tiles this Sunday 12 January at Bukit Brown with Victor Lim. Details here

 

 

 

Kwong Tong Cemetery Kuala Lumpur

 by Simone Lee

4 November, 2013

The Kwong Tong Cemetery is the oldest cemetery in Kuala Lumpur, covering 343 acres of land. It is the final resting place of many prominent city pioneers including Yap Ah Loy, the founder of Kuala Lumpur. In 2007, the 112-year-old cemetery – a green lung in the city – was named a Heritage Park.

My great grandparents are buried in Kwong Tong Cemetery  and in October this year I visited them for the second  time in 20 years.  I can barely remember my first visit as a child. The visit was a result of a confluence of events, the  catalyst : Bukit Brown.  I first  visited Bukit Brown  in July,  a week after the death of my father. In the weeks that followed I joined  the Brownies regularly on their guided walks. I  was moved by the stories they told of the pioneers buried there and their contributions.  On October 5th, after  I conducted  my first guided walk “Stories of Ladies in the Straits Settlements”,  I felt I was ready  to trace the path of my roots.

Even as I embarked on the journey , I was helped by a  fellow Brownie, Jonathan Siew who introduced me to his friend Boon Hin  who knew Kwong Tong Cemetery well. He  drove my mother and I  around the cemetery. Naturally, our first stop was at my great grandparents’ tomb .

My Great grandparents Graves

Just like many other sinkehs (new comers, fresh from the boat from China) at that time, my great grandfather, 利曉春(1888-1962) and his wife arrived from Meixian, Guangdong in the 1930′s. He was a tailor but soon went  into tin mining, a thriving commodity  in Kuala Lumpur at that time. He was successful and brought my grandfather over to help him in the tin-mining business. The entire family (3 generations; great grandparents, grandparents’ siblings and their children) lived in a large British colonial villa at Bukit Bintang (which was later torn down to build shopping malls).

1 Kwang Tong Simone Lee

Kwang Tong: The graves of 利曉春(1888-1962) and his wife, Simone’s great grandparents (photo Simone Lee)

Mah Kan Poh

My great grandparent’s neighbour is  Mah Kan Poh

2a Nearly next to great grandfather is Mr.Mah Kan Poh (photo Simone Lee)

Kwong Tong: Mah Kan Poh (photo Simone Lee)

The epitaph  on  the late Mah Kan Poh’s tombstone erected by his descendants.

“Born on the 14th day of the 12th Moon of Thung Chee Yam Shutt Year, or the 1st of February 1863; and Died on the 29th of May, 1938, or the 1st of 5th Moon, Mo Yen Year – at the age of 77 years.  The late Mr.Mah Kan Poh was a native of Yong Kow village, Soon Tuck District – in the province of Canton. He was very thrifty and hardworking, and took to silk trading as his first walk of life. At the age of 26 years, he came over to Malaya. He was first interested in tin-mining and then – revenue farms. Later on he took to rubber planting and he could walk for miles daily in his estate and mines.  One of his favourite hobbies was hunting. On many occasions, we advised him to give this up, but he turned a deaf ear to our counsel.  In summing up, we might say that the deceased was a man of great courage and determination, and that we and our descendants should follow his footsteps as best we could.”

3 .Mah Kan Poh names of descendants (photo Simone Lee)

Kwong Tong : Mah Kan Poh’s epitaph .(photo Simone Lee)

The  Nanyang Volunteers Memorial erected in 1947

When the Sino Japanese War erupted on 7 July 1937, the Chinese government’s logistic concern was security of supply routes importing war materials into China. This led to the construction of the Burma Road linking Kunming with Yangon port in British Burma. The Chinese government also realized the lack of skilled drivers and mechanics in China. To solve this problem, they turned to China Relief Fund headed by Mr Tan Kah Kee to recruit drivers and mechanics from all over Nanyang, today’s South East Asia. These drivers and mechanics are known as the Nanyang Volunteers, 南侨机工. From February to September 1939, 3200 Nanyang Volunteers left in 15 batches and most eventually served on the Burma Road. Most of the Nanyang Volunteers were Chinese man but there were also some Malay and Indian men and four Chinese women. Source

Nanyang Volunteers Memorial (photo Simone Lee)

Kwong Tong: Nanyang Volunteers Memorial (photo Simone Lee)

The Japanese War Memorial

This site marks a 10,000 square feet mass grave of the casualties during the Japanese occupation. Remains of close to a thousand victims were relocated from the original site, “Tomb of War Victims of the Compatriots of the Republic of China” which was in a dilapidated state.

10 Japanese War Memorial (Simone Lee)

Kwong Tong : Japanese War Memorial (Simone Lee)

The Butcher’s Guild Graves

The "entrance" to the Butcher's Guild graves (photo Simone Lee)

The “entrance” to the Butcher’s Guild graves (photo Simone Lee)

Built in 1931, from the back, it’s a  walk through concrete grids towards the front yard.

13a  Concrete grids of graves  (Simone Lee)

Kwong Tong:concrete grids of the graves of the Butcher’s Guild, view from the back (photo Simone Lee)

The Lim Lian Geok Memorial

Lim Lian Geok (1901-1985) was former Chairman of The United Chinese School Teachers’ Association Of Malaysia (popularly known as Jiao Zong), was a great educationalist as well as a famous social activist.

People from all over the country, put aside their works and came all the way to pay their last respects to him, including high-ranking leaders of political parties. A fund in memory of him was set up, which was later registered as LLG Cultural Development Centre, a non-profit organization. Source

 

Kwong Tong Lim Lian Geok Memorial (photo Simone Lee)

Lim Lian Geok (photo Simone Lee)

Kwong Tong Lim Lian 1 Geok Memorial (photo Simone Lee)

Kampong house near Lim Lian Geok ( photo Simone Lee)

Kwong Tong: Kampong house near Lim Lian Geok ( photo Simone Lee)

Chua Cheng Tuan : The Cycle & Carriage Family

The Cycle & Carriage family: All except for the 2 tombs at extreme left and right (forefront) are in the Chua family gated plot. You can even see the fence surrounding the cluster behind the trees on the left of photo. At the centre of the plot is Mr.Chua Cheng Tuan, the founder of Cycle & Carriage. His brother Chua Cheng Hock  is buried in Bukit Brown.

Kwong Tong centre of the plot is Mr.Chua Cheng Tuan, the founder of Cycle & Carriage (photo Simone Lee)

Kwong Tong : centre of the family cluster is plot of Mr.Chua Cheng Tuan, the founder of Cycle & Carriage (photo Simone Lee)

kwong Tong 1 Cycle and Carriage (photo Simone Lee)

Kwong Tong Another view of the Cycle and Carriage family grave (photo Simone Lee)

A pavilion was built by Chua Cheng Tuan’s family, in front of the family plot, in his memory. Today many other graves surround the pavilion.

A pavilion was built by Chua Cheng Tuan's family  (photo Simone Lee)

Kwong Tong : Memorial pavilion was Chua Cheng Tuan (photo Simone Lee)

Other interesting tombs at Kwong Tong Cemetery

This collective teochew  tomb has a large mound and a tortoise supporting the tomb stone. Engravings of the Confucian story; 24 filial exemplars lines the arms of this large tomb.

11a Large tomb (Simone Lee)

11 Large tomb (Simone Lee)

Kwong Tong:panels with stories of the 24 filial piety exemplars on the “arms” on the Teochew tomb (photo Simone Lee)

5 Interesting Tombs (Simone Lee)

8 interesting tombs.jpg (Simone Lee)

Kwong Tong Tiles (photo Simone Lee)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31  October 2013

At Bukit Brown, it is not uncommon to find ceramic photos of the deceased on their tombstones.  They have withstood the test of time and weathered the elements of sun and rain. This one was spotted in pristine condition during the guided walk on tiles and tomb carvings on Sunday 27 October.

Ceramic photo Tay Koh Bok  1927 Peter Pak

Ceramic photo of Tay Koh Bok who died in 1927 (photo by Peter Pak)’

Mrs Tay Koh Bok (Madam Wee Geok Kiew )

The technology for ceramic photos date back to 1854, originating from France. How are they made?

“A porcelain (or ceramic) portrait is produced by firing an image onto a porcelain plaque at very high temperatures in a kiln for several hours, creating a permanent bond. The result is a vivid portrait that resists fading and the elements for 100 years or more.” source

“….transferring photo images to ceramic was a multi-step, laborious, time-consuming & potentially hazardous process, involving photographic glass plates & several types of light-sensitive emulsion salts (some of which are highly toxic). The emulsified ceramic piece (ie. now affixed with the photo) was then repeatedly fired at high temperature for many hours to obtain an impervious vitrified surface, which was then coated with a protective sealant.” source

Ceramic photos b Joyce Le Musurier

Another view of Mrs Tay Koh Bok  (photo Joyce Le Musurier)

From the mid 1930s onwards, the technology for ceramic photos became  available in Singapore   Before that, ceramic photos were mostly made in China, Holland, Germany & America. So the photo of Tay (1929) could  conceivably have been ordered from China.

Nah Guan Seng of Scientific Photo Studio appeared to be the 1st person to offer photo ceramic services here. His photo studio was located at Bras Brasah Road, while the photo lab was at Paya Lebar.

New Singapore Industry: Ceramic Portraits (ST – 15 Sep 1935):
http://newspapers.nl.sg/Digitised/Article.aspx…

EXCERPT: “The advantages of ceramic portraiture over ordinary photography are many. It never fades, whether exposed to sun or rain, and for use [on] a grave, it has no rival.Kiangsi porcelain is said to be the best in the world for this purpose and is largely used. The work of burning, the most difficult part of the job, is done at the Studio’s laboratory at Paya Lebar. Expert knowledge of the art and great care are necessary in regulating the heat. ”

More on ceramic photos here

Ceramic photos a Joyce Le Mesurier

Ceramic photos (photo Joyce Le Mesurier)

The most spectacular portraits of the deceased are the A4 size photos on the Tok tombs, although it is unclear whether the ceramic photo technology was used. The photo of Onn Cheng Tuan shows her in traditional nonya wear and accompanying  jewelry which also speaks to the material culture of those times.

Tok photo a Joyce Le Mesurier

The Tok tombs (photo Joyce Le Mesurier)

Editors note: Research by Pat Sg of Heritage Singapore Bukit Brown Cemetery

 

Oct
21
0

An Unusual Tableau

 

Dateline” 21 October 2013

The carvings on the tombs at Bukit Brown are commonly drawn from the 4 Chinese classics. Brownie Yik Han spotted one particular carving on an altar table which intrigued him.

The Tableaux of Virtues  (photo Ang Yik Han)

The Tableau of Virtues (photo Ang Yik Han)

His observations  of the characters depicted in the tableau taken from the Romance of Three Kingdoms and what they represent:

Instead of the usual set of suspects this tableau has a rather unique combination of figures which I have yet to come across in other tombs.

The one in the middle seems to be Zhuge Liang from his garb and feather fan. On the right is almost certainly Shun and the white elephant which helped him till his fields. And I guess the one on the left of  Zhuge Liang is Liu Bei as he looks rather regal. Now, each of these characters exemplify a certain virtue: Zhuge Liang – loyalty (忠), Liu Bei – benevolence (仁),Shun – filial piety (孝), so there we have part of the traditional set of virtues 忠孝仁义, the last being righteousness which is as close to the meaning in chinese as we can get in a word.

If the martial figure to the right of Zhuge Liang represents 义, the question is who can this be as it certainly is not Guan Yu, the usual poster boy for that virtue. Of course, this interpretation assumes the two figures at the extreme left are calefaire.

Editors note: If you would like to weigh in on the mysterious characters which have not been clearly  identified, please add your comments on this post.

Your can read more about other tomb carvings by Yik Han on The Wayang in the Tombs , Romance of the Three Kingdoms,  

The Four Professions, 

The Four Loves, 

The Four Appointments, 

 

 

.
Jun
9
0

Two Cats

Two cats flanking a deity’s marker (Photo: Peter Pak)

Are these a tiger and a lion?

 

Related posts:

Protective Guardian

Lions as Guardians

Door Protectors

 

 

Jun
8
0

An Unusual Elephant

Elephant (Photo: Raymond Goh)

 

Compare it with others:

 

May
20
1

A Protective Guardian

Fu De Zheng Shen protecting the tomb of Yeo Lock Ghee who died in 1925, as found by Raymond Goh:

 

Fu De Zheng Shen (Photo: Raymond Goh)

 

Notice the tiles, as well as the tiger guardians.

May
20
0

Recent Finds: Guardians

Raymond found these guardians in a recent bush-bashing expedition:

 

Sikh guard in Lao Sua (Photo: Raymond Goh)

 

unique statues (Photo: Raymond Goh)

May
12
4

Elephant Sighting!

Yes, another pair of elephants found at a tomb near Bukit Brown:

 

Elephants for Mrs Chia Leong Chuan (Photo: Raymond Goh)

The elephant tomb belongs to a Madam Song Chit Neo (Mrs Chia Leong Chuan). Chia Leong Chuan is the father of Chia Hood Theam. From the Chia family tree, we can confirm Mdm Song is wife no 2. Mdm Song had 1 daughter, Miss Chia Lim Neo who married Mr Ong Teck Lim. (Info from Peter Pak)

According to a descendant, Chia Leong Chuan died in 1889.

This tomb was found in Lau Sua, “Old Hill”, a cemetery abutting Bukit Brown. Lao Sua was named ‘Bukit Brown’ on the map by the Survey Department in the 1890s. Bukit Brown Municipal Cemetery ‘borrowed’ the hill’s name when it was established later on, in 1922. (Info from Mok Ly Ying)

There are a few samples of elephant carvings at Bukit Brown, notably on the panels of Ong Sam Leong and Teo Chin Chay.

The Wayang in the Tombs (2)
by Ang Yik Han

The Wayang in the Tombs 1  continues, as Yik Han unravels more iconic scenes  from the Romance of the Three Kingdoms and other popular stories.

“Temple of Sweet Dew” (Gan Lu Si – 甘露寺)

Zhou Yu, Sun Quan’s viceroy, wanted to lure Liu Bei over to the kingdom of Wu and then incarcerate him, on the pretext of marrying Sun Quan’s younger sister to him. Liu Bei’s advisor, Zhuge Liang, saw through this and ordered Zhao Yun, one of Liu Bei’s generals, to accompany him for protection. At the same time, he sent word to Sun Quan’s father-in-law to get Sun Quan’s mother along so that she can view her prospective son-in-law at the Temple of Sweet Dew. With the old lady around, Zhou Yu’s mischief came to naught and Liu Bei and his lady successfully got hitched.

Bowing man on left is Liu Bei, seated lady in the centre is Sun Quan’s mother, man on the right is probably Sun Quan’s father-in-law.

“Temple of Sweet Dew” (photo Ang Yik Han)

Editors note: An insight on how Yik Han deciphered this panel.

The costumes especially the head dress are clues.  If you look at what the man on the left is wearing, you can tell he is not just another official. For some tine I thought the figure in the middle is a male till I looked more closely at her headdress which is what you will expect a more senior lady of high social status to wear. Put these two together and you have a high ranking older male, probably some lord, paying respects to an old woman also of high social status. All the other identified panels from this tomb are based on the Three Kingdoms, and there is one famous part of the novel which has this setting, so that’s how I identified the scene. If you area Chinese opera fan, you may also recognise it easily.”

Here’s an  animated excerpt from the opera

Lui Bei’s Farewell  to  Xu Shu

Compared to his warlord contemporaries, Liu Bei was handicapped by the lack of an able advisor. Fortunately for him, a brilliant strategist named Xu Shu joined him and helped him achieve some small victories. Just when things seemed to be going well for Liu Bei, his rival Cao Cao found out about this and he managed to get someone to send a forged letter to Xu Shu, purportedly from Xu Shu’s mother. The letter claimed she was in Cao Cao’s custody and her life was in danger unless Xu Shu abandon Liu Bei and join Cao Cao’s camp. The filial Xu Shu had no choice but to obey and the inevitable farewell came. On the day Xu Shu left, Liu Bei saw him off with his retainers and followed behind him for part of his journey. Upon reaching a forest, Liu Bei exclaimed “I want this forest to be cut down!” When his retainers asked him why, Liu Bei replied that this was because the trees blocked his view of the departing Xu Shu.

Lui Bei’s sends off  Xu Shu (photo  Ang Yik Han)

Here’s an opera you can view on the sending off.

The panels are from the tombs  of  the Teo Family located in Hill 2

The Third Madam teaches her son (三娘教子)

During the Ming Dynasty, there was a businessman by the name of Xue Guang who had a wife Mdm Zhang and two concubines, Mdm Liu (who bore him his only son Xue Yi) and Mdm Wang. Xue Guang conducted his business far from home. One day, he asked a man from his hometown to deliver five hundred taels of silver to his family. Instead of doing so, the man took the silver for himself and told the Xue family that Xue Guang had died. As they believed the report to be true and there were no news from Xue Guang, Mdm Zhang and Mdm Liu remarried after some time due to the family’s slide into poverty.

Only Mdm Wang chose to remain and take care of Xue Yi even though he was not her flesh and blood, together with an old servant Xue Bao. She weaved cloth to support Xue Yi through school. Xue Yi was however mocked by other children in school as the boy without a mother. Losing his temper, he took it out on Mdm Wang when he got home, saying that she had no right to punish him as she was not his mother. In fury, she slashed the cloth on her loom into two, signifying the serverance of their relationship, shocking Xue Yi and Xue Bao who hurriedly interceded on his young master’s behalf. Xue Yi came to his senses and promised to apply himself to his studies diligently, and even offered the cane to Mdm Wang to punish himself. In years to come, Xue Yi gained honours in the imperial examinations.

The Third Madam teaches her son (三娘教子) (photo Ang Yik Han)

A movie based on the opera can be found here

 

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